Magdy S. Alabady, PhD, MSc

Faculty, Scientist, and Director



Department of Plant Biology

University of Georgia Athens

Address 1:
Department of Plant Biology
2502 Miller Plant Sciences
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Address 2:
Georgia Genomics and Bioinformatics Lab
110 Riverbend Rd., Room 161
Athens, GA 30602



Abundance and Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Vibrio Bacteria Associated with Diseased Elkhorn Coral (Acropora palmata) of the Florida Keys


Journal article


Keri M Kemp, Jason R. Westrich, Magdy S. Alabady, Martin L. Edwards, E. Lipp
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2017

Semantic Scholar DOI PubMed
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Cite

APA   Click to copy
Kemp, K. M., Westrich, J. R., Alabady, M. S., Edwards, M. L., & Lipp, E. (2017). Abundance and Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Vibrio Bacteria Associated with Diseased Elkhorn Coral (Acropora palmata) of the Florida Keys. Applied and Environmental Microbiology.


Chicago/Turabian   Click to copy
Kemp, Keri M, Jason R. Westrich, Magdy S. Alabady, Martin L. Edwards, and E. Lipp. “Abundance and Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Vibrio Bacteria Associated with Diseased Elkhorn Coral (Acropora Palmata) of the Florida Keys.” Applied and Environmental Microbiology (2017).


MLA   Click to copy
Kemp, Keri M., et al. “Abundance and Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Vibrio Bacteria Associated with Diseased Elkhorn Coral (Acropora Palmata) of the Florida Keys.” Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2017.


BibTeX   Click to copy

@article{keri2017a,
  title = {Abundance and Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Vibrio Bacteria Associated with Diseased Elkhorn Coral (Acropora palmata) of the Florida Keys},
  year = {2017},
  journal = {Applied and Environmental Microbiology},
  author = {Kemp, Keri M and Westrich, Jason R. and Alabady, Magdy S. and Edwards, Martin L. and Lipp, E.}
}

Abstract

ABSTRACT The critically endangered elkhorn coral (Acropora palmata) is affected by white pox disease (WPX) throughout the Florida Reef Tract and wider Caribbean. The bacterium Serratia marcescens was previously identified as one etiologic agent of WPX but is no longer consistently detected in contemporary outbreaks. It is now believed that multiple etiologic agents cause WPX; however, to date, no other potential pathogens have been thoroughly investigated. This study examined the association of Vibrio bacteria with WPX occurrence from August 2012 to 2014 at Looe Key Reef in the Florida Keys, USA. The concentration of cultivable Vibrio was consistently greater in WPX samples than in healthy samples. The abundance of Vibrio bacteria relative to total bacteria was four times higher in samples from WPX lesions than in adjacent apparently healthy regions of diseased corals based on quantitative PCR (qPCR). Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) was used to assess the diversity of 69 Vibrio isolates collected from diseased and apparently healthy A. palmata colonies and the surrounding seawater. Vibrio species with known pathogenicity to corals were detected in both apparently healthy and diseased samples. While the causative agent(s) of contemporary WPX outbreaks remains elusive, our results suggest that Vibrio spp. may be part of a nonspecific heterotrophic bacterial bloom rather than acting as primary pathogens. This study highlights the need for highly resolved temporal sampling in situ to further elucidate the role of Vibrio during WPX onset and progression. IMPORTANCE Coral diseases are increasing worldwide and are now considered a major contributor to coral reef decline. In particular, the Caribbean has been noted as a coral disease hot spot, owing to the dramatic loss of framework-building acroporid corals due to tissue loss diseases. The pathogenesis of contemporary white pox disease (WPX) outbreaks in Acropora palmata remains poorly understood. This study investigates the association of Vibrio bacteria with WPX.





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